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unnecessary. on top of that, the huge expansion of economy such as china and india means that in our working lifetimes, the size of the european economy relative to address the world looks set to shrink dramatically. projections have shown europe's share of the world economy declining from 18% to 10% by the middle of the century, and even the united states is not immune from the effect of economic problems. this diminished economic weight will have a major impact on the ability of western nations to achieve their foreign policy goals. we are used to the idea of calling for economic sanctions against nations whose human rights records we find an acceptable. south africa under apartheid being a celebrated example. now we apply them to recalcitrant and regimes. it is already clear that the power of such economic weapons is declining. it follows from this analysis that it will decline much further in the years to come. what is more, much of the economic weight in the world is passing the countries which either do not fully share our concepts of democracy and human rights or for their own reasons
to pass a resolution in the u.n. council on human-rights. india, another rising power and the world's most populous democracy, is traditionally not inclined to support our western inclination to support human rights and economic pressure and military intervention. nor are many of the growing economic power centers in the world, brazil or in the call. not only has the world not converting around our own democratic norms, but according to a survey, global freedom to his third year of decline in 2008, but nearly powerful democratic nations do not share our view of how to conduct foreign policy. the liberal interventionism has generated much debate in britain. but the varying degrees, all have subscribed to it. the economic conditions have enjoyed some support as has military intervention in many countries. iraq being a much more controversial case, but heavily supported at the time. we're all agreed that we would try to intervene in another situation. but in the years and decades to come, the rise of other nations will constrain our ability to act in this way. a further constraint will come i
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